Home > Spring and Autumn Cycling Classics Holidays 2014 > The climbs of the 100th Liege Bastogne Liege
 

The climbs of the 100th Liege Bastogne Liege

Action from Liege Bastogne LiegeIn 2014 we are celebrating the 100th edition of Liège-Bastogne-Liège, the oldest of the great classics of cycling. The original organisers, the RC Pesant Club Liégeois started this race in 1892.

Sports Tours International are the Cycling Classics experts and we are giving you the opportunity in 2014 to ride the LBL Challenge which is the cyclo-sportive version of the event on the Saturday, followed by watching the Pro race on the Sunday. All of this in one fantastic weekend travel package.

You will find out that not all of Belgium is flat and the fact that this is the 100th edition of the race means that this will be a weekend to remember from both a sporting and a historical point of view.

To get you excited we would like to give you a bit of a rundown of what you will be up against if you do decide to ride the sportive version of Liège-Bastogne-Liège.

The Côte des Forges, so decisive in the 1980s, and the Roche-aux-Faucons, which made its debut in 2008, will feature in the 100th edition alongside the legendary climbs of Stockeu, La Redoute and Saint-Nicolas, which helped forge the legend of the race.

For the 100th edition, the organisers vowed to retain a modern course with a nod to all the great climbs in the history of Liège-Bastogne-Liège.

The Liege Bastogne Liege Challenge gives you the choice of 3 distances: 84km, 164km and the full distance

100th Liege Bastogne Liege profile

The climbs of the 100th Liège-Bastogne-Liège:

Côte de la Roche en Ardenne:
The Côte de La Roche-en-Ardenne is traditionally the opening climb of the Liege Bastogne Liege. It comes 70 kilometres into the race is 2.8 kilometers in length and has an average ascent of 6.2%.
 Please find some more information here: Côte de la Roche. You will only ride this climb if you do the full distance event.

Cote de La Roche en Ardenne

Côte de Saint Roch:
The Côte de Saint-Roch comes after 116.5 kilometres and is 1 kilometre long with an average ascent of 11%. Click here for more info: Côte de Saint Roch. You will only ride this climb if you do the full distance event.

Cote de Saint Roch

Côte de Wanne:
The Côte de Wanne comes after 160 kilometres and is 2.7 kilometer lang with an average ascent of 7.3 %. Click here for more info: Côte de Wanne. You will only ride this climb if you do the full distance event.

Molenberg

Côte de Stockeu:
The Côte de Stockeu is also known as the Stèle Eddy Merckx and it comes after 166.5 kilometres. It is 1 kilometre long with an average ascent of 12.2%. Beware that this one has a maximum of 21%!! Please find some more information here: Côte de Stockeu. You will only ride this climb if you do the full distance event.

Molenberg

Côte de la Haute Levée:
Also back in 2014 is the Haute-Levée, which was part of the classic trio inserted in 1952 with Cote de Wanne and Rosier. The Côte de la Haute-Levée comes after 175 kilometres and is 3.6 kilometres long with an average of 5.7%. You can find some more info here: Côte de la Haute Levée. You will ride this climb if you do either the 164km or the full distance event.

Molenberg

Côte de la Vecquée:
You can find some more info here: Côte de la Vecquée. You will ride this climb if you do either the 164km or the full distance event.

Molenberg

Côte de la Redoute:
Then there is La Redoute, which is not so important since the race no longer finishes in Liege but in Ans. Yet La Redoute – since 1974 – is La Redoute. It’s a monument and a rallying spot for the crowd. The infamous Côte de La Redoutecomes after218 kilometres and is 2 kilometres long with an average ascent of 8.8% and a maximum of 21%. All distances will ride this. You can find some more info here: Côte de la Redoute.

Molenberg

Côte des Forges:
Reintroduced for the 100th in 2014 the Cote des Forges was first climbed in 1960 and very crucial in the 1980s when it was the last hill before Liege and a place of attacks or regroupings. All distances will ride this. You can find some more info here: Côte des Forges.

Molenberg

Côte de la Roche aux Faucons:
The Côte de La Roche aux Faucons comes after 240 kilometres and is 1.5 kilometres long with an average of 9.3%. All distances will ride this. In 2009, for Andy Schleck’s victory, Roche-aux-Faucons, introduced the previous year, was decisive. You can find some more info here: Côte de la Roche au Faucons.

Molenberg

Côte de Saint-Nicolas:
Since 1998, St Nicolas, the last climb before the finish, has made the difference because modern cycling is so competitive that you still have 70 riders at the foot of that last hill. The Côte de Saint-Nicolas comes at the end of the race at 257 kilometres and is 1.2 kilometres long with an average of 8.6%. All distances will ride this. You can find some more info here: Côte de Saint-Nicolas.

Cote de Saint Nicholas

This is the history of Liège-Bastogne-Liège – an almost entirely flat course in 1892 and climbs added in the course of time.

Fancy riding the Liège-Bastogne-Liège route or watching the Pro Race?
If this has whetted your appetite and you fancy riding the Liège-Bastogne-Liège official cyclo-sportive and watching the professionals race over the same route, click here for full, details of our package.

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